Saturday, February 19, 2011

Non Residential Conditions and Speeds

Happy New Year to one and all, and welcome back once again to the blog of James K Glaspy, the author of the textbook Driver's Safety, produced to help all drivers safely navigate their way on everyday road trips in all weather conditions and on all road conditions. In this post I will discuss the Non Residential Areas Conditions and Speed Suggestions mentioned in the text.

Covered from pages twenty nine to forty one this section includes suggestions to consider when traveling on main highways and thoroughfares between cities and on multi lane roadways with few entrance and exit points. This is the first of the three different zones mentioned in the book and includes suggested speeds for drivers to observe as the road surface and weather conditions change in this zone.

Mentioned on page twenty under the heading Definitions, a short description of each zone is included to help drivers identify these different areas. Beginning firstly with day dry conditions for cars and four wheel drives, this chapter includes speed suggestions for the driver to observe when traveling on wide straight smooth highways in fine warm clear daylight weather conditions in Non Residential zones

Following on from this paragraph are other suggestions for the driver to observe when the same road with the same signposted speeds quickly narrows and begins winding, and where evasive action by the driver is urgently required to maintain absolute safety within the vehicle.

The text then mentions suggestions for the driver to consider in situations where the sealed surface of the road suddenly changes to unsealed gravel, while the signposted speeds remain the same as before or are unchanged, and where the road now narrows further and includes sharper corners and a less even and less level surface.

The next paragraph covers roads in the same zone with dirt surfaces and with the same signposted limits, and includes suggestions for the driver to follow as the way ahead deteriorates further and becomes more hazardous.

Following this the text then includes night dry conditions for cars and four wheel drives in the same zone and again meticulously goes through each of the different surface conditions of the road while traveling at night in the dark.

The next chapter covers day wet conditions for cars and four wheel drives in the same zone and includes suggestions for the driver to observe in each different road condition while traveling in the rain. The wet weather conditions are then divided into the three different types of rain including light medium and heavy.

Night dry conditions are then covered, followed by night wet conditions in the next chapter all while still in the same non residential zone. The following chapters then cover similar points for truck and bus drivers, and then again for motorcycle and sidecar riders. This completes the non residential zone section of the text and ensures all drivers can now more safely negotiate all main highways and multi lane roadways in all weather and on all road conditions.

DISCLAIMER
The author and publisher of Driver's Safety cannot be held liable for any personal harm or injury, property damage, economic loss, emotional distress or other detriments arising during or as a result of adherence to the suggestions mentioned here and therein. The reader utilizes the suggestions at their own risk and is under no implied or express obligation to adhere to the views expressed by the author. Driver's Safety and the suggestions within it cannot, therefore, be used as an excuse for failing to avoid an accident, and it cannot be used by any individual to excuse or blame a driver for negligence in the event of a collision. The reader uses the text at their own risk, and are entirely personally liable for any detrimental consequences resulting from their actions.

Thanks for reading, see you next post.
James K Glaspy
Author of Driver's Safety: Danger Spot and Speed Manual


Timothy G Albiez
Promotions Manager

Saturday, March 20, 2010

Condition Suggestions

Welcome back readers once again to the discussion about the details of the textbook titled Driver's Safety with the author James K Glaspy, for every driver on every road in virtually every possible weather condition.

In this post I will discuss the procedural section of the text titled Condition Suggestions covered on pages twenty seven through to fifty six. This is the largest section of the book and refers to the five different types of road conditions mentioned therein.

Also covered in this section are the three different zones mentioned, with separate reference suggestion options for wet weather driving, including suggestions for light rain, medium rain and heavy rain. Each of the three different types of vehicles acknowledged in the book are also included throughout this section, and it is intended that virtually every possible road condition that the driver may encounter in every type of vehicle, is effectively and comprehensively outlined.

Beginning on page twenty seven, the actual definition of each of the five road conditions is explained, and a description of how the driver identifies each condition is included. For example, Adequate, refers to inter and intra State highways which link cities together, and includes multi lane freeways, dual carriageways, and conventional well built two lane roadways that are wide, sealed and signposted with declared speed limits, and with clear line-markings for each traveling lane.

Narrow, refers to main country roads which link towns together and these are usually narrower with more hills and corners and narrow bridges, and with less lane line-markings, and with fewer or no signposted declared speed limits, and are generally in worse condition, with large shoulders, pot holes and rough uneven surfaces.

Unsealed, refers to unsealed main gravel surfaced roads which link small communities and farming areas together and are usually narrow dusty and very slippery when wet, and often join areas of land between Adequate and Narrow roads. Track, refers to very narrow unsealed gravel and dirt surfaced roads, which are usually under maintained and often link isolated areas together and are usually only one lane wide with very narrow bridges and causeways, and sharp corners.

All Other, refers to acutely narrow winding dirt surfaced roads and bush tracks usually in very remote areas well away from any settlements, and also includes very narrow one lane lane-ways, between small narrow streets within small communities.

Each of the five different road conditions are included and covered in each of the three different zones mentioned, comprising of Non-Residential areas, Semi-Residential areas, and Residential areas. Each of these three zones is then again divided within the text, into four different driving weather conditions, which include Day-dry, Day-wet, Night-dry and Night-wet conditions.

The three different types of vehicles mentioned in the book are, Car and Four Wheel Drive, Truck and Bus, and Motorcycle, and are all included throughout this entire section, effectively giving the driver a vast array of suggested options to choose from when driving any of the vehicles in any of the different road and weather conditions.

With these suggested options at hand in the text, the driver can now much more safety navigate virtually any road and weather condition which arises, in any vehicle at any time of day or night, and therefore exclude the possibility of being caught traveling too fast in wet or dangerous conditions, or on narrow roads, or when entering sharp corners or negotiating unsealed roads, and most importantly of all when traveling on those roads unfamiliar to the driver.

Thanks for reading, see you next post.

James K Glaspy
Author of Driver's Safety: Danger Spot and Speed Manual

Timothy G Albiez
Promotions Manager


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Wednesday, January 27, 2010

Re-cap on the Important Posts of 2009

Seasons Greetings and a Cheerful New Year to all readers and drivers, and welcome back once again to the blog of the text Driver's Safety with the author James K Glaspy. In this Post I will recap on last years work and briefly mention some new points which have emerged recently and warrant inclusion here. Remember this text can be ordered for viewing from your local library anywhere in the world free of charge and you can access a copy of it there within days of your request.

In the Post titled Update of 22.07.09 and in the sections titled Weather Conditions and Reduced Visibility in the text, drivers are urged here to assess the visibility of the road and the weather conditions each time they enter the vehicle and to apply the appropriate measures mentioned in the text to those various weather conditions. Altered Road Conditions in the text refers to the surface condition of the road and is very important to driver safety. Drivers are urged to identify the shape, width and surface of the road, and whether the road is completely level or not in front of the vehicle, and to apply the appropriate measures mentioned in the text to the conditions outside the vehicle, including applying the various cornering suggestions to the different road surfaces in the different weather conditions.

In the Post titled Driver Fatigue and Turning Suggestions of 11.08.09 and in the sections titled Fatigue, Turning Suggestions, and Safety Suggestions in the text, drivers are here urged to avoid consuming flour based foods and breads prior to and while driving as these may leave you feeling sleepy and lethargic for several minutes soon after consumption. Always ensure cool water is kept in the vehicle and sipped constantly while traveling and keep the vehicle close to the side of the traveling lane at all times, to keep you alert and aware of the road conditions directly ahead, unless unsafe to do so. The limited amount of air inside the vehicle cabin must be kept clean at all times from contamination of any type. To help achieve this keep the fresh air vent on the dash closed to avoid contaminating the cabin air with engine oil fumes and engine exhaust fumes drawn into the cabin through this vent. Open windows slightly to keep a flow of fresh air entering the cabin and be aware that even an air conditioning system in the vehicle that is malfunctioning and running cool then hot erratically, can cause fatigue like symptoms including drowsiness, and the driver must immediately act to avoid being affected by these very dangerous circumstances. In this instance turn off the air conditioner immediately and lower the windows quickly to help overcome and control any adverse feelings of tiredness or illness.

In the Post titled Danger Spots on Roads of 09.10.2009 and in the section titled Danger Spots on Roads in the text, drivers are urged to approach and enter all intersections and rail line level crossings at all times with extreme caution, applying the appropriate measures mentioned in the text to each danger spot to assist in ensuring the risk here is reduced and avoided. Drivers are also urged to repeatedly visually check all approaching road ways at each and every intersection, and all lines at all rail line level crossings well before entering and crossing, even when a green light is displayed at the intersection, and if you have the right of way to proceed, and if the rail boom gates are open and the warning lights are not flashing. A very broad, thorough, complete, and prolonged inspection of each one of the entire nine danger spots is necessary prior to entry, to ensure a safer passage into and through these recognized notoriously dangerous street intersections and extremely dangerous rail line level crossings.

Thanks for reading, see you next post.

James K Glaspy
Author of Driver's Safety: Danger Spot and Speed Manual

Timothy G Albiez
Promotions Manager


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Monday, November 2, 2009

Meet James K Glaspy

Hot off the press, video content regarding Drivers Safety: Danger Spot and Speed Manual by James K Glaspy is here and ready to inform you. Happy viewing.

James K Glaspy
Author of Drivers Safety: Danger Spot and Speed Manual

Timothy G Albiez
Promotions Manager





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Friday, October 9, 2009

Danger Spots on Roads

Welcome again to the discussion with the author James K Glaspy, concerning the text titled Driver's Safety, for drivers of all types of vehicles on all roads in all conditions. In this post I will discuss the section titled Danger Spots on Roads mentioned in the book on pages twenty two and twenty three. This section of the text is most important, and outlines the areas of very high risk for drivers and vehicle occupants, on all roadways. These identified danger spot areas are compiled from records of various State Transport Authorities, and refer clearly to the places where the vast majority of serious vehicle accidents are occurring.

Similar to how they are set out in the text, the nine Danger Spots in order of importance, are (1) at “T Intersections” (2) at “Cross Intersections and at Five way or more Intersections” (3) during “Overtaking and Passing oncoming vehicles” (4) colliding with “Objects that are stationary such as trees, barriers, other vehicles and with Pedestrians” (5) while “Stopping, Merging and during Lane Changing maneuvers” (6) colliding on and into “Bridges and Causeways” (7) at “Roundabout Intersections” (8) when vehicles “Roll Over” on corners and bends, and (9) colliding with “Trains” on level crossings. The text includes detailed options including charts, the driver may choose to observe when approaching each different Danger Spot, on each different road condition, in each different weather condition, and in each different vehicle in each different zone. These Danger Spots are fraught with enormous risk, and drivers may consider the option of applying increased levels of caution when approaching each of these different areas at all times. Other suggestions mentioned in the section titled Danger Spots, include the driver considering the option that to guarantee a safer passage through a danger spot area, then do not completely rely on the boom gates, flashing lights, or train whistle at level crossings, and at intersections. Other driver options included are for the driver to always broadly and thoroughly observe in all relevant directions, traffic and rail movements along the route chosen, well before entering the recognized danger spot areas.

The term 'blind spot' is not mentioned in the text, however, in some circumstances and under some conditions, one's very own eyes can completely fail to see another vehicle approaching at a danger spot area. This anomaly can occur when a driver, let us say, is leaving a private property on a private road, and is approaching a “T” intersection preparing to enter traffic onto a main road. The driver slows down looks both directions and believes the way is clear, then as they enter the main road, suddenly, another vehicle appears right there in front of them, where they were certain, only seconds ago there was nothing. Extensive discussions with several optometrists about this exact matter revealed that a quick glance in these circumstances can reveal that nothing is there at all, when in fact, a much more thorough and repeated and longer observation will show that there is a vehicle there. This discussion suggests that drivers must always look very thoroughly, repeatedly and broadly in all relevant directions when approaching danger spots, and always leave enough time to conduct this methodical and detailed observation, in order to safely enter and pass through each danger spot area.

Thanks for reading, see you next post.

James K Glaspy
Author of Driver's Safety: Danger Spot and Speed Manual

Timothy G Albiez
Promotions Manager


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Tuesday, August 11, 2009

Driver Fatigue and Turning Suggestions

Welcome back to the discussion with the author, James K Glaspy, of the textbook titled Driver's Safety, for constant use in all conditions. I had intended to discuss here the section titled Danger Spots on Roads, however, I have instead by request decided to mention two other equally and very important points covered in the text. These topics are Fatigue, and Turning Suggestions, mentioned on pages sixty seven and sixty nine. If you have already read the text it will be clear to you by now, that the book is entirely centered on accident avoidance and fatigue management, and therefore, if you have not yet viewed the book, some of these points mentioned much later in the text may seem difficult to grasp.

In the section titled Fatigue, suggestions in the text include, the driver considering the options of avoiding the consumption of bread and flour based foods prior to, and while, driving, as the digestion of “these foods may leave you feeling tired and sleepy - usually twenty to thirty minutes after consumption.” (p67, Driver's Safety). Constant consumption of fresh cool water, sipping every few minutes, is also a very effective and available weapon, in combating a vicious attack, from the overwhelming symptoms associated with the driving sickness fatigue. Applied together, and with the other suggestions in the text, including the section titled Safety Suggestions, which includes options the driver may observe in regards to placing the vehicle in the safest part of the traveling lane, usually close to the side, and keeping it precisely there at all times, only moving near the middle of the road when avoiding traffic on the side. Also in Safety Suggestions are options the driver may consider when placing the vehicle a safe distance from the vehicle in front of your vehicle when following. Observing closely and methodically these important suggestions, the driver can manage fatigue far more safely and effectively.

It is also very important to note, that while identifying and researching the common concept of this driver illness called fatigue, where the driver becomes tired and sleepy, sometimes within minutes of entering the vehicle, and in some instances are almost unable to move their arms or legs, and balance on the very edge of consciousness, an interesting observation was made. To recreate the exact same effects of fatigue on demand and immediately, inside the cabin of a stationary vehicle with the engine running fast and the windows closed, various parts of the hot engine had to be lightly doused with fresh motor oil, and those hot oil fumes then drawn into the cabin, through the vehicles own fresh air ventilation system. Escaping hot oil fumes from within the the engine block, from a loose fitting oil level stick, or a loose oil cap, or an open blow-by pipe, will also be drawn into the cabin, through the vehicles own fresh air ventilation system. This observation suggests that the vehicle should always be driven with the windows at least partially down, to ensure a constant flow of fresher cleaner air is always entering the cabin of the vehicle, to assist the driver in avoiding the effects of fatigue.

In the section titled Turning Suggestions the text includes options the driver may observe when entering and turning at intersections. Also included is a description of the repeated observations that can be made to ensure the way is clear when crossing other lanes, and when entering traffic at all intersections.

Thanks for reading, see you next post.

James K Glaspy
Author of Driver's Safety: Danger Spot and Speed Manual

Timothy G Albiez
Promotions Manager



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Wednesday, July 22, 2009

Update

Welcome back to the blog with the author James K Glaspy, discussing and using the book Driver's Safety, as a guide for every driver on each and every road journey. As mentioned in the last blog, I will briefly discuss the group of topics listed there, which are also included in the text. There are, however, many other important topics which I will discuss here, and which are also mentioned in the book, but for now the section titled Weather Conditions in the text on pages eighteen to twenty, are the topics of discussion. This part of the book follows the Introduction and is intended to introduce the driver to the notion of more clearly identifying the road and weather conditions when driving. In particular, the shape, surface and width of the road in front of the vehicle, and of more clearly identifying the quality of the driver's visibility of the road in front of the vehicle and of the road beyond.

In Weather Conditions, these two distinctly different problem areas are isolated and defined, and the text includes separate suggestions that the driver may observe when approaching and passing through each different area. Firstly and very importantly, is Reduced Visibility, which is outlined in the text and refers to times when it becomes simply more difficult to see where you are going, either because of rain, fog, smoke, darkness or sunlight glare etc. Suggestions in the book that the driver may wish to observe, refer to each different reduced visibility condition. These suggestions are intended to help keep the driver safe, and help reduce the risk of the driver losing control of the vehicle, or of being involved in an accident while driving the vehicle in these reduced visibility conditions.

The second area defined and of equal importance is Altered Road Conditions, and the text includes suggestions the driver may wish to consider when the shape, surface or width of the road change, such as in the rain, or on sleet, snow or in mud etc. Also mentioned are unsealed and narrow roads, and most importantly, sharp corners on uneven roads. Included in the text are suggestions the driver may consider when approaching and traveling on different road conditions, and when approaching corners on roads of different types and with different surfaces and in different weather conditions. Again these suggestions are intended to help keep the driver safe, and help reduce the risk of the driver losing control of the vehicle, or of being involved in an accident while driving the vehicle on these altered road conditions.

Thanks for reading, see you next post.

James K Glaspy
Author of Driver's Safety: Danger Spot and Speed Manual

Timothy G Albiez
Promotions Manager


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